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Mickey and the Bear – Distribution deal with UTOPIA

Exclusive report in Screen Daily: https://www.screendaily.com/news/cannes-acid-selection-mickey-and-the-bear-on-inaugural-utopia-slate-exclusive/5139305.article

Former Gunpowder & Sky head of global sales David Betesh arrives in Cannes with an inaugural sales slate for Utopia that includes Cannes Acid selection Mickey And The Bear and Lynn Shelton’s Sword Of Trust.

The Utopia slate kicks off with Actress Annabelle Attanassio’s directorial debut Mickey And The Bear (pictured), which premiered at SXSW earlier this year and stars Camila Morrone as a headstrong teen who must choose between caring for her opioid-addicted veteran father Hank (James Badge Dale) or leaving her Montana home to start her own life.

Shelton’s Sword Of Trust also launched at SXSW and will open in the US through IFC Films. Marc Maron (Glow) and Jillian Bell from Sundance breakout Brittany Runs A Marathon star in the comedic tale of a family heirloom that alt-history conspiracy theorists believe offers proof that the South won the Civil War.

Schwartzman’s (The UnicornDreamland) upcoming feature The Argument stars Dan Fogler from the Fantastic Beasts franchise, Maggie Q, and Emma Bell from The Walking Dead in a comedy about a couple who get into an argument that ruins their cocktail party, only for the guests to decide they should recreate the evening to determine who was right.

Award-winning documentary Fiddlin’ by Julie Simone rounds out the slate, and profiles the rich history, music, and people of the world’s oldest Fiddler’s Convention in the Appalachian Mountains, captured on film for the first time in its 80-year history.

“We’re honored and thrilled to be representing such a remarkable slate of films,” said Utopia head of sales and acquisitions Betesh. “With a range that includes both a celebrated stalwart director like Lynn Shelton and also the absolute brightest of newcomers in Annabelle Attanasio, it’s a slate that we strongly feel constitutes the very best of American independent cinema.”

Schwartzman co-founded the company, which will also launch a technology platform later this year to offer multiple services including a streaming platform.

Mickey and the Bear – Press Breaks

THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE – March 7, 2019
“Tackling Inherited Trauma in SXSW Film Mickey and the Bear” by Beth Sullivan
MICKEY AND THE BEAR was one of three films premiering at SXSW chosen for their preview “This Woman’s Work” – on films at the fest made by female filmmakers and/or tell women’s stories. This piece will run in print on March 8.
 
THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE – March 7, 2019
“15 Movies We Can’t Wait to See at SXSW 2019” by Staff
MICKEY AND THE BEAR is included by Beth Sullivan.
CINAPSE – March 6, 2019
“SXSW 2019: Most Anticipated Films” by Rod Machen
MICKEY AND THE BEAR is included by Ed Travis.
 
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THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE – March 7, 2019
“Tackling Inherited Trauma in SXSW Film Mickey and the Bear” by Beth Sullivan
MICKEY AND THE BEAR was one of three films premiering at SXSW chosen for their preview “This Woman’s Work” – on films at the fest made by female filmmakers and/or tell women’s stories. This piece will run in print on March 8.
 

Tackling Inherited Trauma in SXSW Film Mickey and the Bear

Writer/director Annabelle Attanasio on when bloodlines become scars

As Mickey and the Bear opens, Mickey Peck cycles through the early morning routine familiar to most heads of household: divvying up meds and frying up eggs while calling out for her charge, the unseen Hank.

A rap on the door by the police, however, soon reveals that Hank is neither partner nor child, but a father in need of collection after spending the night in jail for driving under the influence – an occasion proven all too familiar by Mickey’s blasé utterance to the officer: “I’ll get my shoes on.”

In her debut feature, actor-turned-writer/director Annabelle Attanasio chronicles the seemingly loving yet unpredictable relationship between Mickey (Camila Morrone) – a high school senior in remote Anaconda, Mont., with dreams of attending college in San Diego – and her widowed, Marine Corps veteran father (Hold the Dark‘s James Badge Dale), who spends his days engulfed in an oxycodone, boozed-out haze at their shared mobile home; Attanasio described the pair as “thick as thieves” and also the source of each other’s codependent tendencies.

The eldest of three siblings, Attanasio drew heavily from her own experiences taking on the responsibility of her family’s emotional weight. As a kid and teenager with a family background she called “volatile,” she says, “I was kind of oscillating between the feeling of tremendous pride for taking that weight on, but also tremendous guilt.”

Similarly, Mickey shoulders one burden after the other for Hank: hiding his guns every night out of fear of him ending his own life – or perhaps even others’ – and stealing a prescription slip from the V.A. psychiatrist (Russian Doll‘s Rebecca Henderson) lest she face the wrath of an opioid addict without a fix. Though Attanasio insists Hank’s underlying addiction narrative “is not at the forefront” of Mickey‘s themes, she couldn’t ignore it when developing his background as an injured vet. “I couldn’t tell the veteran’s narrative in 2018 without including the addiction narrative and the opioid narrative.” Hank’s far from an upstanding father, but can you really blame him? “He’s failed by the system that really claims his support to him,” said Attanasio. “He served his country, and look how it pays him back.”

“Young girls and young women are taught that martyrdom is the only way to be a woman.”– Writer/director Annabelle Attanasio on the burdens of Mickey (Camila Morrone) in Mickey and the Bear.

Attanasio’s inspiration to write Hank’s veteran storyline emerged when she discovered parallels in how partners and children of Iraq and Afghanistan combat veterans – sometimes injured, often experiencing PTSD, and prescribed “irresponsible amounts of opiates” – inherit their trauma as well. She explained, “On one hand, it’s your responsibility to fix things, but on the other hand, it’s such a larger, systemic problem that it’s totally out of your hands, and you can feel totally hopeless and totally microscopic in this huge failing system.”

For Attanasio, what she sees as Mickey’s “martyr syndrome” is hardly the stuff of fiction. “I think young girls and young women are taught that martyrdom is the only way to be a woman and [that to be] an ideal, upstanding human is to be somewhat subservient and to live your life in service to your partner, husband, and children,” she observed. At the outset of the film, Mickey is “somewhat numb” to those entrapments. “She’s like, ‘This is my life. I live in service to my father. I love him. I would do anything for him because he would do anything for me. He’s all I have.'”


Mickey and the Bear

NARRATIVE FEATURE COMPETITION

Saturday, March 9, 11am, Stateside
Sunday, March 10, 2:30pm, Alamo S. Lamar
Thursday, March 14, 5pm, Alamo S. Lamar

A version of this article appeared in print on March 8, 2019 with the headline: Bloodlines and Scars
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THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE – March 7, 2019
“15 Movies We Can’t Wait to See at SXSW 2019” by Staff
MICKEY AND THE BEAR is included by Beth Sullivan.
 

15 Movies We Can’t Wait to See at SXSW 2019

A few words about some of our favorite films coming to the fest

Mickey and the Bear

As Mickey and the Bear opens, Mickey Peck cycles through the early morning routine familiar to most heads of household: divvying up meds and frying up eggs while calling out for her charge, the unseen Hank.

A rap on the door by the police, however, soon reveals that Hank is neither partner nor child, but a father in need of collection after spending the night in jail for driving under the influence – an occasion proven all too familiar by Mickey’s blasé utterance to the officer: “I’ll get my shoes on.” – Beth Sullivan
READ MORE>

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CINAPSE – March 6, 2019
“SXSW 2019: Most Anticipated Films” by Rod Machen
MICKEY AND THE BEAR is included by Ed Travis.
 

SXSW 2019: Most Anticipated Films

Our staffers share the picks they don’t want to miss

Mickey and the Bear on INDIEWIRE

INDIEWIRE – March 6, 2019
“SXSW 2019: 14 Must-See Films at This Year’s Festival, From ‘Us’ to ‘Booksmart’” by Kate Erbland, Eric Kohn, David Ehrlich, Chris O’Falt, Zack Sharf, Jude Dry, Tambay Obenson
*MICKEY AND THE BEAR is included by David Ehrlich.
 

SXSW 2019: 14 Must-See Films at This Year’s Festival, From ‘Us’ to ‘Booksmart’

From returning Austin favorites to newbie talents to watch out for, we’ve got over a dozen new films you can’t miss at this year’s festival.

The annual South By Southwest Conferences and Festivals — which pretty much everyone knows as SXSW — is hitting Austin, Texas later this week, armed with fresh film offerings (plus music, interactive, and a litany of exciting panels and conversations) and, with it, the promise of a brand new festival-going season. As ever, the annual gatherings is playing home to dozens of feature films and shorts, and while there’s plenty to anticipate seeing, we’ve waded through the lineup to pick out the ones we’re most looking forward to checking out.

From SXSW regulars like Harmony Korine and Lynn Shelton to rising stars like Olivia Wilde and the comedy duo D.A.D.D.Y. and marquee names like Jordan Peele, this year’s SXSW Film Festival has a robust new slate. Here are the ones that look most promising. Stay tuned for more on SXSW’s Episodics section. The 26th edition of the film festival runs March 8 – 17 in Austin, Texas.

“Mickey and the Bear”

“Mickey and the Bear”

SXSW

Annabelle Attanasio could have coasted to a lucrative career as a supporting actress in CBS procedurals, but the former “Bull” star wanted more for herself, and found the courage to leave that (extremely troubled) show after its second season in order to write and direct her debut feature. A coming-of-age drama that’s grounded in the cold realities of growing up in modern America, “Mickey and the Bear” is centered around Camila Morrone (so magnetic in last year’s “Never Goin’ Back”) as a Montana teenager who’s struggling to reconcile her responsibility to her grieving, opioid-addicted father (James Badge Dale) and her own dreams of a better life on the west coast. A story about the complicated relationship between family and independence, the film shines a spotlight on two compelling American actors — both on the cusp of stardom in their own ways — and reintroduces us to a third, whose true calling might have been found behind the camera. —DE

Elizabeth Lail stars in Netflix series YOU

Elizabeth Lail who played adult Lea in Unintended now stars as Guinevere Beck in Netflix series YOU.

From The New York Times:

What Made the TV Show ‘You’ a Hit? Netflix

“The show drew virtually no audience when it premiered on Lifetime in September. Now that it’s streaming, it’s a different story.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/21/business/media/netflix-you-ratings.html